MotorCities National Heritage Area
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By Robert Tate, Automotive Historian and Researcher
Images Courtesy of Ford Motor Company Archives
Published 12.20.2023

1967 Ford pickup press photo Ford Motor Company Archives 2A 1967 Ford pickup press photo (Ford Motor Company Archives)

For the 1967 model year, the Ford Motor Company changed their truck designs. This was also the year that new safety features were mandated throughout the industry.

The 1967 Ford trucks were designed under the direction of Eugene Bordinat (February 10, 1920 - August 11, 1987) who was Ford’s Vice President of Styling and Chief Designer. The 1967 model year saw the introduction of the fifth-generation design. The new cab designs offered wider seats and more shoulder room comfort for the passengers and driver. Although the basic cab design continued to be shared, the front-end sheet metal differences between the light and medium-duty F Series truck models were substantial. The new cab design also featured a new windshield along with a rear window and curved side glass. Many also admired the modified grid-style front grille. The 1967 Ford F-100 models offered power steering, power brakes and a great AC unit.

1967 Ford pickup press photo Ford Motor Company Archives 11967 Ford truck press photo (Ford Motor Company Archives)

Truck historians have said that the base trim became the Custom, and the Custom Cab became the Sports Custom, joining the Ranger series as optional levels of equipment and trim. The 1967 Ford truck models would keep their basic truck design theme for many years to come. In addition, many young buyers would purchase trucks for the purpose of customizing or creating a high-performance truck.

1967 Ford pickup ad Ford Motor Company Archives CROPPED AND RESIZED 3A 1967 Ford pickup ad photo (Ford Motor Company Archives)

The Ford Crew Cab was also redesigned for 1967. This was a F-250 truck with a 149-inch wheelbase which generated strong sales. Some truck historians have called the 1967 Ford truck models the bump side body style.

1967 Ford F 100 pickup Ford Motor Company Archives CROPPED AND RESIZED 4The 1967 Ford F-100 pickup (Ford Motor Company Archives)

In 1967, Ford made extensive changes to the suspension and overall option packages to make the F-Series more of a daily driver than any previous Ford trucks. The 1967 Ford interior was plusher, and the models also featured a padded dash for the driver. Dual brakes were also introduced for a safer ride. A popular advertisement for the 1967 Ford truck said, “Earns its living as a truck. Doubles as a second car. You’re ahead in a Ford.”

1967 Ford pickup ad Ford Motor Company Archives RESIZED 5A 1967 Ford pickup ad (Ford Motor Company Archives)

The 1967 Ford trucks were assembled in Dearborn, Michigan, as well as other factories across the country. Ford’s most extensively changed with light truck for customers was the F-350 which was reproportioned to fit in with the rest of the Ford truck line for 1967. The model offered a 105.7-inc BBC and a 30.7-inch front overhang.

1967 Ford pickup ad Ford Motor Company Archives RESIZED 6A 1967 Ford pickup ad (Ford Motor Company Archives)

Finally, in 1967, Ford introduced a 5-year, 50,000-mile powertrain warranty for their trucks which contributed to the brand’s sales success.

1967 Ford pickup ad Ford Motor Company Archives 7A 1967 Ford pickup ad (Ford Motor Company Archives)

The 1967 Ford trucks are still very popular today with collectors and Ford truck enthusiasts around the world. The trucks became so successful that only minor changes were needed to maintain the 1967 designs until 1975. Historians have said Ford’s truck designers squared off the body lines and accented the flat side panels with a narrow indentation, which on the Ranger models was highlighted by a stainless-steel molding.

1967 Ford F 250 GR Auto Gallery RESIZED 8A 1967 Ford F-250 (GR Auto Gallery)

In conclusion, the 1967 Ford truck models were a huge success. The trucks were all new with plenty of style, with the F-100 Styleside truck appealing to those who wanted both utility and good looks. Today, many 1967 Ford pickups are still on the road, and they reflect a story that will always be part of our automotive legacy.   

Bibliography

Wagner, James K. “Ford Trucks Since 1905.” Crestline Publishing, 1978.

Fordification.com. “The 1967-72 Ford Pickup Resource Technical Articles.”

Velocity. “A Glimpse into the Future: Fifth Gen (1967-1972 Ford F- Series).” January 28, 2022.